brightlotusmoon: (Snow White Blood Red Light Pale)
So. Multiple friends have suggested I write something like this, because no matter how often I say it, I still get invalidated, scolded, told I shouldn't be doing it because it upsets people. And of course, it would be talking about my life, my disabilities, my personal health, in public forums.

To paraprhase a friend: "...taking someone's lived experiences as they apply to their particular disability and how it expresses itself, and saying that they can't talk about that because it will make other people feel bad, is not okay and it invalidates them to varying degrees. Different disabilities affect different people in different ways."

In other words, sometimes comparing things is bad. We are human. Humans all have problems. Each human has their own set of problems. Some humans want to talk about their personal problems in ways that other humans find annoying, upsetting, unsettling - but other humans find those ways comforting, eye-opening, powerful.

I don't know how else to say it, so I'll be blunt, and this time I am not going to pull any punches:
Read more... )
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)

I have been snacking on whole fresh mozzarella cheese, salami slices, and roasted almonds, along with apple slice smeared with cashew butter. Good stuff. When Adam comes home from work, we'll eat the eggplant parmigiano that has been soaking for two days.

In the medical science community, there is a slow push to make chronic fatigue syndrome an actual disease as well as fibromyalgia. This may at least help them take us more seriously.
All I know is that Cymbalta is doing lovely things, surprisingly. After adding Rhodiola Rosea and Garcinia Cambogia, which gently boost dopamine and serotonin, I feel better. Still in a depression episode, still having anxiety blackouts and transient global amnesiac episodes. Buuut it's better. It doesn't seem any bettet since it all began in 2011. But I can feel things happening. It's all qualia anyway. All subjective.  I can never tell anyone to be me anyway.

brightlotusmoon: (Asha)

Copied from a comment I left on Facebook. During a discussion regarding how cerebral palsy might or might not be seen socially as an active disability that impacts a person's social or professional life
***

I am medically disabled.
I'll be medically disabled and socially disabled even when society makes everything accessible and easier to navigate.
My disabilities are part of me forever because of my brain being abnormal and different from the average. I'm cool with that.
I don't want to fight or struggle or handwave against it. Disability is a part of Joanna Me, just like shortness and writerbrain and cat loving an writing paranormal urban fantasy with future elements.
It is one definition of Joanna Me but it is not the biggest. It gives me powerful insight into my world and the world around me. It's like a friend woven into my neurology. However, there are much stronger definitions to show.
Being disabled and having a disability are often unconnected depending on how the person feels. Hence the disconnect between medical model and social model. Cerebral palsy is medical, but social depends on how society is able to make room.
If someone wants to see my disabilities first, that's cool, as long as they see the rest of me too.
I identify as disabled. One of my disabilities is cerebral palsy. It is a result of congenital  brain damage. I will always be brain damaged. I will always be disabled. That is fine by me. I embrace being disabled while having a disability.
The End.









brightlotusmoon: (Asha)

Good things.
The personal therapy protocol is juuust starting to work. Slowly and softly. The doctors said slipping off is natural. But my slips are fewer. I think the new drug is working much faster than expected. No terrible side effects after all between dry mouth and that tingly sensation that the world is shiny shiny shiny. But I can already feel those most compulsive thoughts starting to be quiet.

Now, if I could just not be badgered by acquaintances who want me to be better now now now. Yes, this has had me in its psychiatric grip for over four years. It takes tiiime to get the ideal treatment. Yaaaaugh, leave me alone. You don't know. You are not inside my neurology.
Repeat. Rinse.
Those of you who get it, you get it.

So much meditation. It is in my dreams. I am ready to work myself through and beyond. Shut up about it taking all these years. Damaged braining is hard.

I make it hard for people to love me well enough to help. Which is why I need to do this on my own.

/venting ranty ramble

brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
So, my thoughts have been spinning merrily amidst what could be a spiraling episode of... Oh, fuck, probably everything at once. After I had a chat with three doctors about the consequences of stress-related memory loss, I quietly decided to start a private mindfulness therapy, which I have only been sharing with the psychologist, for advice, while I move forward in my own brain to stop my own brain from destroying my mindstate.

Tomorrow, I see my general physician and have her write a referral for the local hyperbaric oxygen therapy center. Although it's a bit premature, as they have yet to call me back about an initial consultation. While I was filling out their online New Patient form, I started wondering if they would even take someone like me, with two dozen illness. Even though cerebral palsy is the cornerstone. I just feel so excited about it. That's a good thing. I can still most of my emotion things.

What I find beautiful and fascinating about my private therapy protocol is that almost nobody believes me. I have been stuck in something insane since 2010. Why would they believe I would "get better" now, so many years later after therapy and medications and meditative exercises? Then again, none of them have been in long term therapy or medication. It really does take many years to spur a change this massive. Hence the secret protocol, which includes a possible medication update and potential oxygen therapy.

I don't expect anyone to believe me. I don't expect anyone to believe in my desire to change with this therapy protocol. How could they? Why would they? I am the same as I was when symptoms started. But I don't want their belief. I don't really want support if there is no actual active knowledge. How can you say "Hey, I've been there, I get it, fist bump in solidarity" unless you really have gone through a similar structure of treatment repeatedly for a grab bag of illnesses that mindfuck you for no reason?
Actual legitimate question, BTW.
If you're also a parent of someone with interconnected psychiatric and neurological disorders, I would love input, because when I try to explain these things to my mom who only has hereditary ADHD controlled via lifestyle, my emotion-brain starts shutting down so my technical-brain can word at her, and I know she wants less science and more human. I'm trying. I just cannot get past that very protective mental guardian who shields emotion-Joanna from Outside. And oh, as much as I love Serena, she feels it is easier and gentler to let me sleep while she and Koan the calico kitten organize and compartmentalize all the Me. Ananta works hard enough balancing out all the neuroweird that Alicia in my private epileptic Wonderland can't reach. I haven't had much success in psychically merging with Asha. We are working out my dissociative and depersonalization episodes first.

I will do this. It will happen. Steps have been severely taken. Hard to talk. But if you think you get it, I would love a discussion via Private Message. I am willing to reveal bits and pieces of my Rebuild Joanna Brain Project to acquire tips and advice from those who get it.

Now, see, I view many people as family beyond my blood family - who shall remain the besy family I would want. Various people in my social circle - friends plus family - have always stood with me. I will always need and want that. But for those who are truly normal and looking at me with confusion, puzzlement, exasperation, fear, anger... and the type of condesencing that means pats on the head, chuckling, and "I love you sweetie. Of course you'll change." "You do nothing. You never help. You are too self absorbed, you don't think, you claim memory loss. It is all right, dear. We are used to hit. Just finish writing." Followed by another hair tousle. I'm used to it. It's routine because I am me.
I am not out to prove them wrong, not entirely. I am out to prove to myself that my neuroplasticity really might eradicate the worst of the annoying symptoms.
Maybe this whole autistic ramble came from my hope and excitement over this slow gentle therapeutic process. If loved ones want me to speed it up, I can turn away for a while to meditate.

All I know is that my own husband has been putting up with me forever, and that says something huge.

Love you, LJ family.
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
http://www.nancyfulda.com/movement-a-short-story-about-autism-in-the-future

It really is a gorgeous and poetic story. At least one member of the support group I'm in has pre-judged it because there is the concept of a "cure" via grafting in the brain, but said treatment is clumsy and doesn't always work. So, hey, I always say read the story before claiming "if it's about cures it's not beautiful." It's not about cures, it's about living in a mind that sees the world in a way that most people never will.

Autism is vastly different than my other disabilities. I'm proud of it. I'm proud of my brain, everything it has accomplished and attempted during its neuroplastic growth. And having a mother who, while thankfully is not a raging martyr mommy, is at least accepting and respectful of the idea that autistics generally don't want any cure, is good good. I am still so grateful that I wasn't diagnosed until adulthood. And that self-diagnosis is just as valid as a piece of paper from doctors; most auttstics who realize they are autistic (I had both and also encouragement from autists who have known themselves for years and years). It's not that "we were diagnosed with autism" - it's that we realized that our autism makes us what we are. I'm different and I love it. I don't want to assimilate with neurotypical brains. Like the girl in the linked story, I want to look at the universe on the atomic level and know how beautiful it is.
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
Yes, obviously. Sheesh.

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/6081918

Friends have been sharing this back and forth into repetitive boredom, so I'll just add: Yes, this is obviously a strategy I've been implementing for a while in order to manage my mental illnesses, it is totally part of a very very specific personal therapeutic ritual that will take at least another couple of months to complete, and for Loki's sake, this stuff takes time, quit asking if I'm better yet. I've only been ritualizing for three years; most of this takes at least five. Plus, I can't just magically fix damaged neural pathways by thinking happy thoughts. Most people spend decades in therapy, while their acquaintances urge them to fix themselves faster. The frantic urging especially comes from people who've never even been in states of extreme anxiety, clinical depression, endless chronic pain, obsession, compulsion, memory disintegration, traumatic stress, dissociation, depersonalization, derealization. I often hold back from just punching walls. Therapeutic ritual and mindfulness in mental artistry takes time and a large amount of control. I've only been doing it since 2011. By 2015 something will at least be, as they say, Fixed. At least enough to allow other treatments to fall into place. Until I finish that intense ongoing ritual, I'll keep on battling where battles must be fought.
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
Okay, first thing:

Bad day bad day. Brain misfires, pain everywhere, spasticity, OCD episode, distractions, hypersensitivities, gut issues. I will say, however, that probiotics and omega-3 supplements of specific kinds are actually doing good things to my brain. It's not really evident in any of my outward behavior, but I can absolutely feel something going on.
Dear neuroweird science students: Is impulse control mainly frontal lobe? I have a Thinky Thing I'm thinking about, but I need medical professionals and medical students to confirm. I know of Things that can help me personally and specifically, but I need to make sure I'll be doing it properly. Also, this means staring slackjawed at my MRI photos and calling my neurologist.

***

Unrelated, copied from Facebook.

Well, this person said what I was thinking.
https://www.facebook.com/thautcast/posts/830987393625539?fref=nf&pnref=story
My personal need for disability labels is personal. My need to be able to relate to people via stories and fiction. So many people have told me things like how they "don't see disability" (sorry, I have to laugh at that) and don't see labels... and that's cool. Really. That's fine. But that is not how I see the world and that is not how I view myself. Being able to say, "Yeah, I'm disabled, and these are the medical issues I have" is indescribably relieving, even powerful; it gives me a power to choose and know my own self in a very intense way that I honestly can't describe.
My disabilities are not really eccentricities or special powers; they are painful and they will get worse as I age - and I'm talking about the comorbid, co-occuring, associated syndromes and symptoms. Eccentricity? Gift? Er. Yaaa...aay? I mean, sometimes my seizures cause wicked euphoric hallucinations when I close my eyes? That's... fun? And I suppose having severe anxiety and ADHD-PI and OCD and SPD could be my mind working out itself and it's environmental relationship?
So, um, so far I'm not seeing eccentric quirks and gifts. But I don't see myself the way someone who thinks that way would see me. I've met disabled people who say they aren't disabled, and a part of me marvels at the cognitive dissonance, a part of me wonders if they're completely rejecting the medical model of disability, a part of me wonders what they do when symptoms and syndromes kick them around and act truly disabling. I say nothing to them because I know it's their thing. The only time I'd want to try to sway them is if they want to spread their belief that disabilities are not disabilities, because that can become harmful and dangerous to the social model. As Stella Young said, no amount of smiling at a staircase will turn it into a ramp. So, as much as someone refuses the disability label, I really need them to consider it beyond their beliefs.

I'm just saying. We all have very different ways of talking about, discussing, portraying, coding, and having disabilities. I'm just glad that right now, I am able to very very openly discuss mine the way I want without being punished for it. And so should others, particularly those who think differently than I do. That's what makes discussion.

***

Also? I find it funny that so many people are like "OMG aliens, what if aliens come here, wouldn't it be amazing, we should learn alien languages, I bet they don't even communicate like we do, so we should be open to new communicative experiences!"
And then they're all like "WTF autistic people you're so weird we don't want you weirding us up we don't like you why can't you be normal like us!"
And I'm all, "*throws hands up* WHAT DO YOU WANT FROM US, YOU JERKS!"

***

I am having A LOT of thinky thoughts on why people reject the term disability in favor of eccentricity, quirk, gift. Not just abled folk but people with mental illness like bipolar or schizophrenia. I am still determined to wrap my mind around visibly physically disabled folk, like with cerebral palsy, who say they aren't disabled. It fascinates me because that view is so so alien to me. As long as the conversation is civil if course.

***

http://thebodyisnotanapology.com/magazine/just-try/
http://webcast.ucdavis.edu/llnd/467b5ad7?channelId=0abfe11894d742c7b159a535058c09ce&channelListId&mediaId=29f030d8c24a4b718c1c2936187278b8

***

I don't do Twitter. But lots of my friends do. Fuck Autism Speaks. I'm not pushing anyone to do the #Notmssing thing. But I do believe it is vital to send Autism Speaks the crucial message that autism is not a "thieving disease to be eradicated" because IT IS OUR BRAINS. WE are autism. We are born with a different operating system that doesn't really comply with the standard. People laugh about meeting alien cultures with other ways of communication, and yet we are right here, a metaphor, and they not only turn away from us, they actively seek to erase us. So. No. Bad Autism Speaks. No. Stop it. Nobody is missing. We are right here. We are staring right at you, angry and sad. We have been here all along. We have been speaking out all along. You just haven't listened.

Also, hells no we're not ready to meet any alien cultures. Not if we keep trying to erase members of our own.



***
http://webcast.ucdavis.edu/llnd/467b5ad7?channelId=0abfe11894d742c7b159a535058c09ce&channelListId&mediaId=29f030d8c24a4b718c1c2936187278b8
(Nick Walker is awesome)
Autism as a neurocognitive variance. Indeed. It's a disability because it hinders how we interact with life all the time. But there is nothing wrong with us. It's just a rewiring of our brains before birth or at birth.
Like, with me. I was born a fetus. I was a 26-week-old fetus when I was "officially born". My developing brain didn't have time to pick and choose. It just grabbed whatever it could, crammed stuff in, got a random shiny new operating system that was able to work around all the dead white matter, and figured it was good enough because I still needed to finish growing into being a baby, you know? Like, "Fuck it, we'll deal with this brain damage later, just keep the body going, okay? Move it move it move it avoid the gaps in the dead parts, come over this way, this construction project is gonna take a few more months than planned, so we don't have time for sick days, guys. What's that OS? It looks kind of tangled. That's fine, it's shiny, build it in, hook it up, whatever. Hey! I told you guys to avoid the dead zones! Awww daaamn, somebody get a new team over there please? No workman's comp here, this is preterm, okay? Just go go go..."
And that's where I got my brain.
So, dear allistic and neuro-typical assholes who question my right to exist, who insist that kids like me are missing, stolen, lost, forever silent: Fuck off. My brain worked hard to be itself, and just because my OS isn't yours doesn't make me lesser.
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
I did not realize how weirdly difficult it can be to answer the question, "So, what triggered this C-PTSD episode and panic attack?"

I mean, how DO you explain all the fucked up, freaked out, screaming neuronal mess that can cause brief blackouts, episodes of time agnosia, obsessiveness bordering on mania, hyperventilation, emotional outbursts, etc etc etc.

And there is no one thing, two things, any things. That's why it's Complex PTSD. It can be anything and everything. Maybe it's because I read some news articles about police violence against disabled people with no legal consequence for the police. Maybe it's because a friend got triggered by their own things and during our conversation something triggered me completely innocently. Maybe it's because I had a nightmare about that time years ago when a skeevy dude tried to hurt and assault me near a shopping center and was beat up by another guy who just looked at me and said, "Run!" and I fled up the stairs until I couldn't breathe and never looked back. I don't know. I don't KNOW, guys.

You know? You know.

I have reasons for not talking about this stuff outside my psychologists and certain friends. Support is better than silence, though, and I have so much support and empathy to give, so when I need it I reach out to the friends who know.

Anyway. Yes, I took my meds. Yes, I did my exercises. Yes, I ate well enough.

And my cats have not let me out of their sight. (KITTIES)
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
Magnolia plus Magnesium plus GABA: Good for sleep. Yes.

From a supplement website:

"Q: What is Magnolia Extract?
A: Magnolia Extract is a standardized herbal extract made from the bark of the Magnolia officinalis tree. It is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been used for thousands of years. Our Magnolia products are highly concentrated for magnolia's active ingredients, and contain 90% honokiol and magnolol.

Q: What does Magnolia Extract do?
A: Promotes relaxation, supports healthy adrenal function, supports emotional well-being, and aids in digestion. The bark contains two phytochemicals, honokiol which may reduce common anxiety, and magnolol which supports emotional wellness. Together they enable one to feel better mentally and emotionally.

Q: How safe is Magnolia Extract?
A: Studies show small doses of magnolol and honokiol are safe for normal emotional support. However, large doses may cause a sedative effect and interact with alcohol, increasing its effects. Therefore, driving or operating dangerous equipment should be avoided when taking larger doses of magnolia extract. Magnolia extract has a two thousand-year-old safety record for use as a Chinese medicine, and as an effective relaxant. Use it confidently and safely … but use it responsibly, according to directions.

Q: Who should use Magnolia Extract?
A: Anyone who wants a safe, natural way to relax and reduce anxiety should consider supplementing with Magnolia Extract.
Additional Information:

Magnolia Extract is a standardized herbal extract made from the bark of the Magnolia officinalis tree. It is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been used for thousands of years. Roex Magnolia Extract is highly concentrated for magnolia's active ingredients, and contains 90% honokiol and magnolol.

Magnolia Extract promotes relaxation, supports healthy adrenal function, supports emotional well-being, and aids in digestion. The bark contains two phytochemicals, honokiol which may reduce common anxiety and magnolol which supports emotional wellness. Together they enable one to feel better mentally and emotionally.

Studies show small doses of magnolol and honokiol are safe for normal emotional support. However, large doses may cause a sedative effect and interact with alcohol, increasing its effects. Therefore, driving or operating dangerous equipment should be avoided when taking larger doses of magnolia extract.

Magnolia extract has a two thousand-year-old safety record for use as a Chinese medicine, and as an effective relaxant. Use it confidently and safely … but use it responsibly, according to directions."
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
https://adiaryofamom.wordpress.com/2013/03/21/hate/

"In one of my favorite posts about identity-first language, Zoe at Illusion of Competence writes the following:

I was at a conference last summer at which Ari Ne’eman gave an introductory speech, and it fell to him to explain why ASAN uses identity-first language. One of the things he said, which I really liked, was “If I’m on a flight and the airline loses my luggage, I don’t arrive without my autism.”

No matter what our view of autism’s origins, I think we can agree that it isn’t an appendage that can be taken on and off at will. It travels with our kids. IN our kids. As PART of our kids. And as such, it’s simply not reasonable to expect them to understand that we loathe autism but we don’t loathe them. Or that we hate this thing that afflicts them, but they shouldn’t hate themselves. Because even if we could get them to understand the difference intellectually, we’d be hard-pressed to get them to FEEL the distinction. And after the other night (and last night again and this morning again while Katie was still coughing and Brooke was still screaming), I was convinced that if we continue to tell these kids, through our words (to them or in front of them) or our actions, that we hate / fear autism, we are teaching them to hate / fear / pity themselves for having it. People do not separate themselves from what they have / how they act / what they feel / how they experience the world. And we as a society don’t either.

For the love of God, Katie had a COUGH – something temporary and fleeting. Something that will, God willing, be gone in a matter of DAYS. A cough – not the filter through which she tastes, sees, smells, hears, touches and perceives everything in her world. Yet because Brooke hated the cough, Katie’s entire identity became conflated with it. Driving with Katie, talking about how she felt, the implications of the moment rushed over me. And the weight of those implications was almost unbearable.

If we keep FIGHTING autism, HATING autism, FEARING autism, talking about the UTTER HAVOC that autism wreaks on us and our families, we will end up with a generation of children who have learned to hate themselves – or who, at the very least, hate things about themselves upon which they have no control or that, if they can control, they do at tremendous cost to their sense of well-being and self-esteem."
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
https://plus.google.com/100400881094218310019/posts/2QhbpM1cg9c

So, that's the link to all the photos they took during my MRI. You know, from here:
http://brightlotusmoon.livejournal.com/1673757.html
http://brightlotusmoon.livejournal.com/1672704.html

I'm trying to still figure out where my neurological seizures happen, since I have problems in the corpus callosum but there's no mesial damage, so. Time to research neuroscience. And then talk to my neuroscientist.
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
Well, shit. I should have realized. It's been over a year. And I just wrote this comment over at a friend's. I should post it here as both an anniversary reminder and as a general thing.

A lot of parents of autistic kids and adults don't know how to work with and help their children, turning to damaging methods like ABA - which I am still reading up on myself, as scary as it is. But lately some of those parents have taken up a mantra of "speak to autistic adults; listen to autistic adults." Nothing About Us Without Us, indeed.

'See, my autism is my new best friend. Really new. I don't know its favorite sub-shade of green yet. It doesn't know why I prefer cobalt blue and hate powder blue. We are circling each other, even after a whole year of being introduced despite having a whole life together. We are both really uncertain about specific TV shows for different reasons. But I don't know what my autism would say to non-autistic parents of young autistic children, and my my autism isn't sure those parents would like it and thinks I might sound like a jerk. So, I'm kind of flailing. What DO you say?'

#littleautisticthings
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
The replacement medical dog tag, which features the main medical conditions that essentially encompass most other syndromes - cerebral palsy and autism have so many comorbidities and associated disorders that most medics will get the idea.

medicalalertpendant


It came via a website called Sticky Jewelry. They're pretty awesome, and affordable. This came with a free cleaning chamois cloth and a free medical identification card on which to fill out vital information, like emergency contact, physician phone number, prescriptions, blood type.

The pendant I attached it to is an Etsy-bought custom-made ouroboros pentacle with an amber stone. It has a lot of power for me. Also, it's a fun stim.
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
...I do need to get an account of my own, mind you.

A friend posted this, so I'm sharing.

****

You need a (free) Medscape account to read this (you may, er, need to fudge a little about *technically* being in the healthcare profession . . . my opinion is that those of us who need to spend significant time managing our medical care are roughly equivalent to being at least *part-time* healthcare workers.) ;P

It's important to stay up-to-date on this, because medical continuing education programs don't necessarily require keeping up with specific disease criteria, and may be more general in nature -- plus, the trigger-point/tender-point exam has been around for so long, it's a matter of habit with some clinicians. You will be best-armed to manage your own care, if you walk into your appointments without assuming that your doctor is necessarily knowledgeable about the *most* recent research.

"[T]he 2010 criteria was to create diagnostic criteria that were more user-friendly for clinicians to use in practice— for example, reliance on the tender point exam, which we know may be incorrectly applied in practice and be misleading in suggesting that FM is primarily a muscle or tendon problem as opposed to being primarily a problem with sensitization and dysregulation of the CNS. The new criteria rely more on pattern recognition of the constellation of chronic widespread pain along with other characteristic features such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, cognitive dysfunction, and irritable bowel symptoms—symptoms that may occur either as an independent entity or in association with other chronic illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis."

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/831471

Also, a recent study has shown that fibromyalgia patients process multiple types of sensation differently, not just pain sensations:

"Brain scans of patients with fibromyalgia showed that they processed nonpainful stimuli, such as sound and touch, differently than the brains of people without the disorder. This may explain why patients often complain of hypersensitivity to sensations in everyday life, author Marina López-Solà, PhD, from the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Colorado, Boulder, told Medscape Medical News.

"What we wanted to know is whether in fact there was something in the brain that would account for these feelings in response to stimulation that is not painful in nature," Dr. López-Solà said. The study, published online September 15 in Arthritis & Rheumatism, used functional magnetic resonance imaging to show that patients with fibromyalgia processed visual, auditory, and tactile sensations with reduced brain activity in primary sensory processing areas, combined it with higher activity in sensory integration areas such as the insula, compared with individuals without fibromyalgia."

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/831831

Please feel free to quote and repost anywhere -- just please don't attach my name to it, since I don't want to lose access to *my* Medscape account. Thanks!

***
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
Because part of All The Therapy is blogging my feels. And this was short enough anyway.

'kay.

I'm having a Being Elsa day. My symptoms are awful and well beyond control, and the smallest thing triggers the fibromyalgia pain and the mild C-PTSD symptoms. I cannot even hear or read someone speak from the cult of positive thinking without internal screaming.

I've seen many other friends here having similar issues. I'm not dealing with a terminal disease, but said terminal friends keep reminding me that we are all "In This Together" (that's my current ringtone. It's from Apoptygma Berserk).

I admit, the Being Elsa days seem to counter the Being Alice days (Being Alice is my code for epilepsy, seizures, and postictal aka post seizure state. Being Elsa is a new code for mental illness and neurological disorders including all chronic anxiety, social phobia, chronic stress disorders aka complex post traumatic stress disorder, sensory processing disorders, and some co-existing conditions linked to spastic ataxic cerebral palsy).
That was much words but I was born full of words. I blow word raspberries.

I totally do have gleefully joyful fun talking about my medical history. Interested friends have told me that I tend to discuss it clinically and technically, as though describing a patient who is not myself. I've been told that my medical and scientific wordening as a curious patient has helped fellow chronic illness patients examine their own conditions closely to find ways to help treat specific symptoms. That is such an honor.

Anyway. Is anyone else having their own version of a Being Elsa day?

(Alice is from Alice in Wonderland and Elsa is from Frozen. Because of what happens to them. Etc. I actually still have not seen Frozen all the way through yet. I will, obviously, and it will be many times. But I relate desperately well to Elsa, her hidden aspects, her representing disability, autism, childhood abuse, chronic anxiety, PTSD, personal orientations, and her love for a sister beyond a potential unnecessary husband. I only have chosen sisters and I love them so hard like the stars.)
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
...and then you find a blog post like this.
http://autistictimestwo.blogspot.com/2014/09/i-wanted-you.html
And everything you felt about being such, deep inside, comes up and out, and you catch it in a clear quartz prism, and you turn it and examine it, and you hold it up to as many lights as possible. And it is all beautiful and even those cracks and dark spots are beautiful.

People don't always pay attention when an autistic person is killed by their parent or guardian specifically because of words like "burden" and "burned out caregiver" and "mericful" and "for the best" and "couldn't take it anymore."

Like Kelli Stapleton - and yeah, typing her name made me feel a pain in my fingers. I have no emotion for her. I could hate her, but this is beyond hate. No sympathy. Kelli took her 14-year-old autistic non-verbal daughter Issy and attempted murder-suicide via carbon monoxide poisoning, rather than seeking actual help, therapies, and treatments for Issy and herself. And she has a cheerleading section. I cannot wrap my mind around this. People are supporting her, calling her brave, shattered, wonderful, because she "put up with lower-spectrum autism" in her child for so long that she finally snapped. Feel sick? Me, too.
This happens dozens of times a year, more, and rarely is it reported. Now, I didn't know until this past spring, when I began navigating the careful waters of autism activism. I can't swim. And some of my new friends are dragons. I keep a lot to myself. However, I need those dragons, those growling leopards, those night-seeing owls, to make sure I navigate.

The point is that when a neurotypicalm able-bodied person says "I love you because you are amazing because of your disability"... that is powerful. I have never, ever felt unwanted; I had intense, deep, powerful love my entire life. However, my social peers, educators, and adult peers obviously had different reactions.
One phrase I dislike is "Don't let your disability define you"/"Don't let your disability become your identity." I laugh a wry laugh. See, a congenital disability is part of what defines me. A congenital disability is part of my identity. I realize and understand completely when those phrases apply to acquired illnesses and acquired disabilities. But I'm someone who is, as they say, disabled and proud.

So that blog post is a big hug.
brightlotusmoon: (Asha)
Copied from Facebook.

1 "When you’re going through a thing like this, you tend to latch onto ANYTHING that isn’t panic inducing and repeat it over and over to avoid the things that are terrifying..."

2 One time, a long while ago, I was having a panic attack, and so I shifted my thoughts to looking for a lost plush animal to move away from the panic, and I told Facebook because I have friends here who understand, and I was told by a random acquaintance that it was unnecessary to post about having lost a toy, that nobody cared because what good would it do, and that I should post more meaningful things.
Panic attacks don't care even more, but at least they start to fade once you work through them and work past them. Internet trolls don't. Especially not those who don't care what panic attacks do to specific people and how they get treated by specific people.
*quick deep breathing*
Goodbye, trolls. I turn away from you. I will quit talking about being harrassed and move on.
Also, panic attacks suck. So I am focusing on my stuffed animal toys and my cat Callisto, who is snuggled up with me like comfort.
That is all.

3 My phone case from Diztronics is deep blue with blue and silver glitter. It's like someone spray glittered the TARDIS. My Galaxy S4 is red, so it is amusing. :-D

4 I did a chaotic organization of medical supplements, loved toys, loved books, skin care; and all the patterns I'm seeing are making me squeal and dance. And now to watch all of Futurama on Netflix, and then Uncle Grandpa, and then The Amazing World Of Gumball, and today is a Soft Clothing day because my skin is being sensory processing disordered and hypersensitive to pressure. Etc. And The Amazing Amanda will understand because she and I are like autist sisterlings.
#littleAutisticthings

5 I decided that resistance bands are better than push ups for my capabilities and issues. Grab each end of the rubber band and lift up to my chest, pull and hold for one second and do as many reps as I can. It works various upper arm muscles, shoulder muscles, chest muscles, and ab muscles if I engage them. Then my brain sorts through patterns to connect to different muscle sets and brain signals that might work best with the hemiplegia. Sometimes I color code the central nervous system activities when I can. It takes a hell of a lot of meditative concentration and it doesn't always work. But it is fun and it is soothing.
Compromise, compensation, modification, personalization. My mother always made sure I could do stuff however I had do.
#LittleCerebralPalsyThings
#LittleAutisticThings

6 "So please, just listen. I know you’re afraid, but being afraid is alright. Because didn’t anybody ever tell you? Fear is a superpower. Fear can make you faster and cleverer and stronger.
And one day you’re gonna come back to this... and on that day you’re going to be very afraid indeed. But that’s okay, because if you’re very wise and very strong, fear doesn’t have to make you cruel or cowardly. Fear can make you kind.
It doesn’t matter if there’s nothing under the bed or in the dark so long as you know it’s okay to be afraid of it.
So listen. If you listen to anything else, listen to this. You’re always gonna be afraid even if you learn to hide it. Fear is like a companion, a constant companion, always there. But that’s okay because fear can bring us together. Fear can bring you home.
I’m gonna leave you something just so you’ll always remember. Fear makes companions of us all."
- Doctor Who Season 8 Episode 4 "Listen"
-Now one of my own personal fear litanies

And also, see, as a signature, I tell stories and engage in conversations as though my Facebook friends are already with me.
It is highly frustrating for some, and I've been harassed over it by random strangered acquaintances and bored trolls because they want to know stone details in rational and logical ways that are opposite from my whimsical spontaneous blurting out wordenings, but they don't realize that I am waiting to reveal, I am preparing those stone details for later in the story and that is how I work and how I brain, because a neuroweird brain like mine isn't very straight, it is curvy and looping and wavy and look over there at the shiny. Autist? Sure. Artist? Yes. Atypical neurology? Forever.
Details are for the comments sections, in which the story continues like a deep conversation. I never plan to engage conversations, but when it happens it becomes magical and it becomes anything.
And so this monologue in an episode about facing fear and patterns of lonely and alone and companionship and need, I see stories and conversations that veer everywhere across a dozen thought processes, neural connections zooming and smashing and spiking as ideas slam into each other.
Come, friends, fall into the story with me! We can converse in the comments. But don't be harsh. Be kind. Be clever. Be an empathic friend, not a severe critic. Be companions, and we will ride these blurted engaged stories buoyed by the strength of companionship.
Spoilers.
http://www.threeifbyspace.net/2014/09/doctor-who-804-listen-quotable-quotes-points-to-ponder/

7 "Scars tell the story of our lives, inscribed upon our skin. I’d not remove mine for the world." -Failure To Fire Comic via comments section
http://ftf-comics.com/?comic=face-reveal-2
It took me so, so long to accept the scars I had as a newborn. Like... three decades. Alex has acquired scars, so I feel that I have a sort of mental dissociation with that for some reason. I still feel irritated, literally and figuratively, with my scars, since no matter what they hurt but are also stories.
Discussion to continue in comments. I'm in a weird headspace.

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